What is Aquaphobia? Symptoms, Causes, And Treatment

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What is Aquaphobia

Aquaphobia is the irrational fear of water. It can be triggered by something as simple as a bath, or as severe as drowning and being unable to breathe. This form of anxiety is often accompanied by panic attacks which can make it even worse for sufferers.

On top of this, aquaphobia can cause physical symptoms such as dizziness, nausea, and headaches when around water. A common misconception about aquaphobia is that it’s only restricted to people who have an extreme fear of water (or other liquids). However, there are many sufferers who simply don’t feel comfortable in situations where they would usually be allowed to swim.

What is Aquaphobia?

What is Aquaphobia

Aquaphobia is a real phobia, which means that it’s characterized by an irrational fear of water. Many people with aquaphobia find the thought of being submerged in water or even splashed by rain too terrifying to bear.

In order to understand how this works and what makes it so unique, let’s take a look at some of the most common symptoms:

  • Fear of being in open water (swimming pools, lakes).
  • Fear of taking showers or baths (or even having them near you when you’re already soaking wet).
  • Avoidance of going somewhere where there might be water nearby—even if you know it won’t be dangerous!

Symptoms of aquaphobia

symptoms of aquaphobia

In order to understand how this works and what makes it so unique, let’s take a look at some of the most common symptoms:

  • Fear of being in open water (swimming pools, lakes).
  • Fear of taking showers or baths (or even having them near you when you’re already soaking wet).
  • Avoidance of going somewhere where there might be water nearby—even if you know it won’t be dangerous!
  • Panic attacks.
  • Dizziness and shaking, sweating, feeling of choking or drowning, feeling like you are going to suffocate or die.

Causes of Aquaphobia

The causes of aquaphobia are many and varied. Some people are born with a natural fear of water, while others may experience it after an accident or other traumatic event.

Some people have developed an intense dislike for the taste of saltwater due to childhood experiences that they can’t remember (which should help explain why they’re afraid of swimming pools). Others may be afraid of being trapped in a pool or spa because they were once held underwater by their parents as punishment.

Aquaphobic also fear being unable to breathe underwater; this is especially true if you’ve suffered from asthma or other breathing problems before adulthood—and even more so if those conditions have worsened since then!

How does Aquaphobia trigger?

Aquaphobia is triggered by being in or near water, or even thinking about it. It’s also common to be triggered by seeing someone else swimming, boating or fishing. Other triggering events could include hearing the sound of a pool pump or filter system; feeling anxious about having to swim at school or work, and thinking about an event that occurred while in the water (such as nearly drowning).

You can watch this video and can test whether you are aquaphobic or not.

Treatment for Aquaphobia

Therapies for aquaphobia include medication, exposure therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), psychotherapy, and hypnotherapy. These treatments can help you cope with the fear of water.

Medication is usually prescribed to treat the symptoms of aquaphobia and other phobias that result from anxiety disorders. It may also be used to treat mental health conditions linked to these fears; for example, depression or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Cognitive behavioral therapy focuses on changing underlying beliefs about yourself or your situation that may contribute to your difficulty coping with anxiety triggers such as being in a public place where there are people who might trigger them into having an attack–such as at work or school–or being near water where they imagine themselves being trapped underwater without any rescue options available if they need them immediately!

Final Thoughts

Remember that the first step is always to seek help. You can talk to your doctor, or try taking a class or two at your local community center. The important thing is that you’re starting somewhere, and we hope this post has helped give you some ideas on how best to get started!